Materials Properties Compatibility And Storage

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Compound Suitability For Fluids Gases & Chemicals

The following data and information has been derived from many sources but should be regarded as a general guide only. Consideration of compound selection for any given application should be in association with pressure, temperature and media requirements.

 

AU         Polyurethane

EPM      Ethylene Propylene

FKM      Flourocarbon

IIR         Butyl

VMQ     Silicone

NBR     Medium Nitrile

Key To Rating Guide

  • Satisfactory
  • Fair
  • Doubtful
  • Unsatisfactory

–             No Data

 

Immersion Medium           AU   EPDM   FKM     IIR     VMQ   NBR         Immersion Medium AU    EPDM   FKM     IIR     VMQ   NBR
Acetaldehyde                       – Acetic Acid Gas at 70°C        C Acetic Acid Glacial             D
Acetic Acid Diluted             B
Acetone                              D
Acetylene                            D
Acrylonitrile                        D
Air                                       A
Air at 180°C                        D
Air With Oil Mist                 A
Ammonia                            D
Ammonium  Hydroxide       D Aniline                                D
Asphalt                               C
Beer                                    A
Benzene/Benzol                 D
Benzaldehyde                     C
Blast Furnace Gas             C
Brake Fluid veg.                 D
Bromine Water                   D
Bunker Oil                          C
Butane                                B
Calcium Hydroxide             D Calcium Hypochlorite         D Carbolic Acid (phenol)        D
Carbon Bisulphide              D
Carbon Dioxide                  D Carbon Monoxide at 70°C      C Castor Oil                           B
Chlorine                              C
Chlorinated Solvents          D
Copper Sulphate                D
Cotton Seed Oil                  A
Creosote                             C
Cyclohexane                      A
Diacetone Alcohol              C
Dibutyl Phthalate                A
Dichlorobenzene                C
Diethylene Glycol               A
Diethyl Ether                       D
–        D      A       A
–        D      B       B
–        D      A       A
A       D      A       A
A       D      A       C
A       A       A       B
D       D      B       B
A       A       A       A
D       A       D       A
D       A       D       A
A       D      A       D
A       B       A       B
D       A       B       B
D       A       D       B
A       A       A       A
D       A       D       D
B       C      B       B
C       A       C       A
A       D      A       C
D       A       D       D
D       A       D       B
D       A       D       D
A       A       A       A
A       A       C       C
D       B       C       D
D       A       D       D
A       A       A       A
A       B       A       A
B       C      B       A
A       B       C       D
D       A       D       D
A       A       A       C
D       A       D       C
D       A       D       D
D       A       D       D
A       C      A       C
C       B       C       A
D       A       D       D
A       A       A       B
B       D      B       D
D      Diethyl Sebacate                D      D
D      Dioctyl Phthalate                D      D
D      Dioxane                              D      A
D      Dipentene                           C      D
D      Diphenyl                              C      D
A      Epichlorohydrin                   –        B
D      Ethylene                              –        –
A      Ethylacetate                        D      B
D      Ethyl Alcohol                      A       A
A      Ethyl Benzene                    C      D
B      Ethylene Oxide at -20°C           D      A B      Ethylene Glycol                  D      A
D      Fatty Acids                          A       D
D      Ferric Chloride                    C      A
A      Ferric Sulphate                   C      A
D      Fluorine (Gas)                    D      D
D      Fluorobenzene                    D      D
B      Formaldehyde                    D      A
D      Formic Acid                        D      B
D      Freon 11                             B       B
A      Freon 12                             A       –
A      Freon 21                             C      D
A      Freon 22                             D      D
A      Freon 113                           A       D
D      Freon 114                           C      –
D      Furan                                  D      C
A      Furfural                               D      D B      Gasoline U.S. spec             B       D D      Glucose                              D      A
D      Glycerine                            D      A
D      Glycols                                D      A
A      Hexane                               A       D
A      Hydrazine                           B       A D      Hydrochloric Acid diluted        D      A D      Hydrochloric Acid (dil) 70°C     D      A
D      Hydrochloric Acid conc.      D      B D      Hydrogen                            A       A D      Hydrogen Peroxide             D      A A      Linseed Oil                         B       D
D      Lubricating Oil                    B       D
C       C      C       D
B       C      A       D
D       A      D       D
A       D      C       B
C       D      C       D
D       –        –        D
A       –        –
D       A      D       D
A       A      A       A
B       D      D       D
D       B      C       D
A       A      A       A
A       D      B       B
A       A      C       A
A       A      B       A
A       C      D       D
A       D      D       D
A       A      C       A
D       B      C       D
B       D      C       B
A       A      D       B
D       C      D       D
D       A      D       D
B       D      C       B
B       A      C       A
D       C      C       D
D       C      B       D
A       D      D       B
A       A      A       A
A       A      A       A
A       A      A       A
A       D      B       A
A       A      D       B
A       A      A       A
A       A      D       D
B       A      B       A
A       A      A       A
A       A      A       A
A       A      D       A
A       D      B       A
Immersion Medium AU   EPDM  FKM      IIR     VMQ   NBR         Immersion Medium       AU     EPDM  FKM      IIR     VMQ   NBR
Mercuric Chloride               D
Mercury                              A
Methyl Chloride                  D
Methyl Ethyl Ketone           D
Methylene Dichloride         D
Milk                                    A
Mineral Oil                          A
Naphtha                              C
Naphthalene                       B
Natural Gas                        A
Nitric Acid concentrated     D Nitric Acid diluted               D
Nitro Benzene                    D
Nitro Propane                     D
Nitrogen                             A
Oleic Acid                           D
Oxygen at -40°C                B
Oxygen at 200°C               C
Ozone                                C
Palmitic  Acid                      D
Paraffin                              D
Petroleum Oils                   A
Phenol                                D
Phenyl Benzene                 D
Phenyl Ethyl Ether             D
Phenyl Hydrazine               D
Phorone                              –
Phosphoric Acid 45%             D Phosphoric Acid 45%170°C    D Picric Acid diluted              D
Piperdine                            D
Plating Solution (Chrome)       D Plating Solution (Others)        C Potassium Hydroxide         D Producer Gas                     C
Propane Gas                      B
Propylene                           –
Pyridine                              D
Pyrrole                                –
Sal-Ammoniac                   C
A       A      A
A       A      A
D       A      D
B       D      B
D       B      D
A       A      A
D       A      D
D       A      D
D       A      D
B       A      D
D       B      D
B       A      B
D       B      C
B       D      B
A       A      A
D       A      D
A       A      B
B       B      D
B       B      B
C       A      C
D       A      D
D       A      D
D       B      D
C       A      D
C       D      D
D       A      C
–        –       A
A       A      A
A       A      A
A       A      A
C       D      C
–        C      –
–        A      A
A       A      A
A       A      A
D       A      D
–        A      D
B       D      B
C       –       D
A       –       A
A       A       Sewage                              C A       A       Silicone Oils & Greases     A D       C       Silver Nitrate                      D
A       D       Soap Solution                    A
D       D       Sodium Salts                     D
A       A       Steam  below 120°C          D A       A       Steam above 120°C          D C       B       Stearic Acid                       C
C       D       Styrene                              D
B       A       Sulphur Chloride                D
D       D       Sulphur Dioxide dry           D B       C       Sulphur Acid diluted          D C       D       Sulphuric Acid conc.          D C       D       Sulphuric Acid Fuming      D A       A       Tar                                      D
B       A       Terpinol                              D
A       B       Toluene                              D
A       D       Transformer Oil                  C A       D       Trichlorethylene triad         D D       A       Turpentine                          D
D       A       Vaseline                             D
B       A       Vegetable Oil                     B
D       D       Vinegar                               C
D       D       Wines & Spirits                  D
D       D       Xylene                                D
D       D       Zinc Salts                           D A       D
D       B
D       B
D       A
D       D
C       D
C       A
D       B
A       A
C       A
–        B
D       D
–        D
B       A
A       A       A       A       A A       A       A       A       A A       A       A       A       A A       A       A       C       A A       A       A       C       A
A       B       A       A       D A       B       B       B       D B       A       B       C       A D      B       D       D       D D      D       D       D       D
A       A       A       D       D A       A       A       A       D B       A       B       D       D D      B       D       D       D D      A       D       D       D
D      A       D       D       B D      A       D       D       D D      A       D       D       B D      A       D       D       D D      A       D       D       A
B       A       D       D       A C      A       B       D       B A       D       A       D       D A       A       A       A       A D      A       D       D       D
A       A       A       D       A

The following tables are designed as a guide to the correct selection of the sealing element and energiser materials for your particular application. The sealing element is dynamic making it’s mechanical properties the priority in selection. More detailed capabilities relevent to individual
seal types are given within the catalogue.
The static energisers are rubber based compounds therefore fluid compatibility and temperature range are the main criteria for selection.
Materials For Sealing Element.

Material suffix Description Colour Material  Properties  &  Application
B Bronze PTFE  with additives Brown Very  high  mechanical  duties.
Good  compressive  strength  for  oil  hydraulics. (Standard  Material  for  styles  CS5,  841,  851,  CS6,  751  &  741)
C Carbon PTFE Black Medium  Mechanical  duties.
Generally  for  pneumatic  applications  and  water  based  fluids (Not  Seawater).  For  soft  mating  surfaces  and  unlubricated conditions.
G Glass  PTFE Black High  mechanical  duties.
For  water  and  oil  hydraulics,  pneumatics and  unlubricated  applications.
V Virgin PTFE White Light  mechanical  duties.
For  anti-extrusion  rings  and  pressure  seals.  Low  friction  and almost  totaly  inert.  Suitable  for  food  and  potable  water applications.  (NWC  approved)
Standard  material  for  anti-extrusion  rings,  CS1,  CS2,  CS4
VM Modified PTFE Blue Medium  mechanical  duties.
Much  lower  wear  rate  than  Virgin  PTFE. Very  good  chemical  resistance
Standard  material  for  styles  931,  941,  951
UH UHMWPE Off White Medium  mechanical  duties.
For  water  and  oil  hydraulics,  pneumatics,  and  unlubricated applications.  Lower  temperature  and  speed  range  than  PTFE but  very  good  abrasion  resistance.  Suitable  for  soft  mating surfaces.
Materials  For  Energiser
Compound Temp Range (Intermitant) °C Recommended For NOT Recommended For
NBR Nitrile (Standard Material) -40 to +120 Petroleum based oils and fluids, cold water, Silicone greases and oils, ethylene glycol based fluids, Di-ester based lubricants. Automotive brake fluid, Phosphate ester fluids.
EPM, EPDM
Ethylene Propylene
-50 to +150 Phosphate ester based fluids, Automotive brake fluid, Water, Steam. Petroleum based oils and fluids, Di-ester based lubricants.
IIR Butyl -40 to +150 Phosphate ester fluids, Silicone greases and fluids. Petroleum based oils and fluids, Di-ester based lubricants.
FKM
Flurocarbon
-50 to +200 Petroleum oils, Di-ester based lubricants, Silicate ester lubricants,Silicone greases & fluids, Certain phosphate ester fluids. Skydrol Fluids, Low molecular weight esters & ethers.
Si Silicone -90 to +240 High analine point oils, Chlorinated di-phenyls, Dry heat. Most petroleum based fluids, Water and steam.
Note: If Energiser Materials Other Than Nitrile Are Required, Consult CLARON For Part Number.
Storage:
Deterioration of rubber products will be minimised if stored in accordance with BS 3574:1989
P.T.F.E. is regarded as having no restrictions in terms of shelf life.
Continuous Operating Temp. °C with Seal Materials
DIN
Class
ISO
Class
Type Description NBR FKM AU EPDM POM PTFE PA
H HH Mineral Fluid Mineral Oil without additives 100 150 100 NS 100 200 120
H-L HL Mineral Fluid with anti-corrosion and anti-ageing additives 100 150 100 NS 100 200 120
H-LP HM As HL plus additives reducing wear, and raising load capacity 100 150 100 NS 100 200 120
H-LPD As H-LP but with detergents and dispersants 100 150 100 NS 100 200 120
H-V HV As H-LP but with improved viscosity temperature behaviour 100 150 100 NS 100 200 120
HFA E Flame Retardent with Water Emulsions of mineral oil in water.
Water content 80-95%
55 60 40 NS 55 55 55
HFA S Synthetic oil in water Water content 80-95% 55 60 40 NS 55 55 55
HFB Emulsions of water in mineral oil..
Water content 40%
60 60 40 NS 60 60 60
HFC Aqueous polymer solutions.
Water content 35%
60 60 NS 60 60 60 60
HFD R Flame Retardent without Water Phosphoric acid ester based NS 150 NS 120 80 150 80
HFD S Chlorinated hydrocarbon based NS 150 NS 120 80 150 80
HFD T Mixtures of HFD R and HFD S NS 150 NS 120 80 150 80
HEPG Biodegra- dable Polyglycol based NS 100 NS 120 80 150 80
HETG Vegetable Oil basec 60 60 60 NS 60 60 60
HEES Fully synthetic ester based NS 100 60 NS 100 100 100
NS = Not Suitable

Storage and Packaging of Rubber and Plastic products

Packaging

The requirements of packaging form an integral part of storage procedures as well as providing accurate identification. With the exception of Silicone Rubbers which may deteriorate if totally enclosed, all vulcanized rubbers should be sealed or wrapped to avoid the free access of air.
The packaging materials should preferably be opaque and free from such substances as copper naphthenates, creosote preservatives or any film containing plasticizer.
The product should be packaged in such a manner as to avoid distortion. Some suitable materials are:-
Polyethylene coated Kraft paper, aluminium foil / paper / polyethylene laminate and opaque polyethylene film.

Storage

1) Temperature. The storage temperature should be maintained below 25°C, however below 15°C extra care should be taken to avoid distortion.
2) Humidity. The relative humidity shall be less than 65 % r.h and such that, given the variations in temperature,
condensation is avoided.
3) Light. Protect from light sources, particularly direct sunlight and intense artificial light with high U.V
4) Radiation. Protect from all sources of ionizing radiation (refer to BS3664, BS4094 and BS4513)
5) Ozone. Protect from ozone and avoid organic vapour, combustion gases, mercury vapour lamps and any high voltage electrical equipment which may generate ozone in the storage area.
6) Deformation. Articles should be stored in strain-free conditions to avoid permanent deformation of the
article or indentations on the sealing surfaces. Rings of large diameter, such as O-Rings may be stored by forming into three loops to avoid creasing or twisting.
7) Contact with fluids. Articles must be stored free from contaminants such as petrol, grease, acids and
cleaning fluids or their vapours.

Correct packaging of the stored articles will avoid many of the problems associated with unavoidable environmental conditions and rotation of stocks will keep these harmful effects to a minimum.

 

Shelf Life Control

 

All articles with a limitation to their Shelf Life are marked by Claron with a cure date/batch date on the packaging. All Claron cure dates are traceable through the batch number for a minimum period of 10 years

 

All Claron materials with a restriction to their shelf life fall into three basic groups, A, B and C.

A fourth group, U, is designated as being of unlimited shelf life if stored in accordance with these packaging and storage requirements.

 

Each group has an initial period of safe storage followed by further storage periods after re-inspection and assessment.

 

PERIODIC INSPECTION CRITERIA

 

Before any component is stored for any extension period or further extension period, the following inspection criteria is mandatory

Visual inspection – Inspection of the items or components in a representative sample for

  1. Permanent distortion, mechanical damage, flats or other defects
  2. Tackiness or noticeable surface softening or hardening
  3. Cracks (Extend or flex the material and check with a 10x magnifier)

If any of the above are found, the product must be removed from stock and destroyed.

Testing – Providing that the representative items or components inspected are satisfactory then the products shall be tested to ascertain that their performance characteristics are maintained.

All initial Shelf Life dates are calculated from the Cure Date / Batch Date and are categorised as follows for unassembled products:-

 

GROUP A         Initial period 5 years , possible extension periods every 2 years Natural (NR)

Polyisoprene (IR) Polyurethane (AU) Styrene-Butadiene (SBR)

 

GROUP B         Initial period 7 years , possible extension periods every 3 years Acrylonitrile-Butadiene (Nitrile) (NBR)

Blends of Acrylonitrile-Butadiene and Polyvinylchloride (PVC) Epichlorohydrin (CO)

Polyacrylate (ACM) Polychloroprene (Neoprene) (CR)

Polyisobutylene-Isoprene (Butyl) (IIR)

 

GROUP C        Initial period 10 years , possible extension periods every 5 years Chlorsulphonated Polyethylene (eg. Hypalon®) (CSM)

Ethylene Propylene (EPM)

Terpolymer of Ethylene Propylene (EPDM) Fluoroelastomer (eg. Viton®) (FKM) Silicone (SI)

 

GROUP U         Unlimited Storage period if packaged and stored in accordance with these requirements and the further detail recorded in BS 3574 :1989

Polyoxymethylene or Polyacetal (POM) Polyester Elastomer (eg.Hytrel®) (TEEE) Polyamide (eg.Nylon) (PA 66) Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)

(Consult Claron for storage conditions relative to etched PTFE) Polyetheretherketone (PEEK™)

Ultra-High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE) Phenolic Resin (SRBF)

 

GENERAL NOTES

 

When stored under low temperature conditions, stiffening of the material must be expected, heat soaking at a temperature higher than ambient for several hours will return the material to a normal state.

No materials should be inspected in the cold stiff state. Do not use ovens or hot water to achieve this condition. The appearance of a “Bloom” is unimportant and is no evidence of degradation

Records of Shelf Life Extensions should be kept in a register and a new Shelf Life Expiry Date recorded.

 

 

 

Merk

Claron Polyseals

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